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Girls Who Wear Glasses

"The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity." Dorothy Parker
explore-blog:

Celebrate the 63rd birthday of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, published on July 16, 1951, with the wonderful art project Beholding Holden.

explore-blog:

Celebrate the 63rd birthday of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, published on July 16, 1951, with the wonderful art project Beholding Holden.

(Source: explore-blog)

slaughterhouse90210:

“They didn’t deserve her. No high school boy did. She was better than that, Sylvia knew, bigger and better and ready to shed her skin like a snake.”—Emma Straub, The Vacationers

slaughterhouse90210:

“They didn’t deserve her. No high school boy did. She was better than that, Sylvia knew, bigger and better and ready to shed her skin like a snake.”
—Emma Straub, The Vacationers

The Pick-Up Artist

Every week, a certain delivery man (for a company I’m not gonna name but, you know, there are brown shorts involved) visits the library and basically flirts with all the women at the desk.  He’s a nice guy and very friendly.

Last week, he needed some help accessing some videos on his iPad.  So, I looked at it to see if I could help him figure out what was going on.  It appeared to be an online course, complete with texts and videos to watch.  Like, an affirmational/Tony Robbins type of thing.  Only…it was about how to unlock your inner “pick up artist.”  

I didn’t comment on it.  Because, you know, professional.  But, what I wanted to say to this guy was, “Sir, you don’t need this.  You have already unlocked this part of yourself.”

One U.S. Supreme Court justice referred to Netflix as “Netflick.” Another seemed not to know that HBO is a cable channel. A third appeared to think most software coding could be tossed off in a mere weekend.

The people ultimately responsible for making legal rulings in the modern world are often dangerously out-of-touch with it. [via Lawrence Hurley @ Business Insider] (via huffpostpolitics)

(via libraryadvocates)


Happy Birthday, Joseph Cotten - (May 15th, 1905 - February 6th, 1994)
"I didn`t care about the movies really. I was tall. I could talk. It was easy to do".

Happy Birthday, Joseph Cotten - (May 15th, 1905 - February 6th, 1994)

"I didn`t care about the movies really. I was tall. I could talk. It was easy to do".

(Source: the-dark-city, via the-dark-city)

Nonstop Excitement

Today’s been kind of a big day.  Not because I was promoted.  Or given a raise.  Or met George Clooney (how could you, btw, be getting married, George?!).  Today was big because I spent the entire day doing my job and, like, seriously loving it.  I was invited to join a big planning committee for our Summer Reading revamp, I helped one of my staff plan a big change to our Early Literacy Learning area, I did a BUNCH of paperwork (necessary evil), and I helped out my coworkers with some organization and planning.  I mean, doesn’t that sound totally thrilling?  

Here’s why I’m so pumped:  today is the first day I’ve really worked, worked, worked all day doing what I came here to do.  It’s not glamorous but it is so totally what I’ve always wanted to do.  I feel useful and excited and like I’m doing something worthwhile.  For the first time, I’m absolutely positive that coming here - leaving my last job a bit early, leaving my family, uprooting for real - was the exact right thing to do.

The image of the sexy librarian reminds us that, regardless of their appearance or accomplishments, women are first and foremost sexual objects. And that’s pretty much business as usual for American masculinity.

Unpacking an Erotic Icon: The Sexy Librarian | Savage Minds

h/t librarianlauren

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

(via thelifeguardlibrarian)

librarylagrange:

Need help getting a book?  Ask a librarian.

librarylagrange:

Need help getting a book?  Ask a librarian.

How US libraries are becoming community problem solvers

(Source: omglibraryschool)

4 months ago- 4

An Absence

So, since the last time I actually posted something here (and who reads it anyway?), I’ve gotten a new job!  I am now the Children’s Services Supervisor at a branch of a large-ish, Metro DC-area system.  Anyway, it’s great.  I love it and feel like it was a solid move coming back to the town where I was a teacher for seven years.  

So, we’re probably the second largest branch in the system here and pretty visible considering we’re smack in the center of a suburban, planned community area.  Still, in the last couple of days I’ve spoken with more than a few patrons who are “first timers” at our branch.  For one reason or another (some had moved into the area, others didn’t know we were here somehow), they are just making their way here for the first time.  

My interactions with these patrons really got me thinking.  At my last job, I worked at the largest main branch of a large-ish system.  I was on the Children’s floor and we definitely went out of our way to be friendly and welcoming when we got new families in.  However, we also got a lot of new people on a pretty regular basis.  Here at this branch, that happens more rarely.  So, when someone announces themselves as a new patron, we tend to be especially welcoming.  Is that the fundamental difference between a busy, “urban” main branch and the more rural or “suburban” branches?  I mean, of course it’s not the only difference, but it seems to me a very striking difference.

I guess I’d love to know if anyone else has experienced this difference in how new patrons are treated at larger branches vs. smaller/more suburban/more rural branches.  What has been your experience?

slaughterhouse90210:

“They were all in their early thirties. An age at which it is sometimes hard to admit that what you are living is your life.” ― Alice Munro, The Moons of Jupiter

slaughterhouse90210:

“They were all in their early thirties. An age at which it is sometimes hard to admit that what you are living is your life.”
― Alice Munro, The Moons of Jupiter

Veronica Mars | Pop Culture Advisory

libraryjournal:

Last week, the Kickstartered Veronica Mars movie came out in a limited theatrical release as well as being available simultaneously on Video On Demand. It may have slaked fans’ thirst for the escapades of a wisecracking, whip-smart female sleuth and her star-crossed lover(s?) for a little while, but they’ll be looking for more content in that vein before long.

Tumblarians, did you know that LJ media editor Stephanie Klose writes  a monthly online RA column focusing all type of media (from books to online games) that embrace and reflect pop culture? You can check out her previous columns here: http://reviews.libraryjournal.com/…/pop-culture-advisory/ 

Great stuff for your patrons!

(Source: addtoany.com)

5 months ago- 17

FIVE MINUTES BEFORE OPENING

librarianproblems:

Submitted by Cheryl Diaz

on patrons

librariesbuildcommunity:

via jennyandthelibrarians:

there’s a librarian code of conduct that we all learn about, but there should really be a patron code of conduct too, one that doesn’t police our visitors, but instead reinforces why we’re all here:

  1. you’re not “bothering us” by asking a question, i swear! i work here mostly to help you find what you need. it’s nice of you to be considerate though, and i’m sorry if others have made you feel less welcomed.
  2. it’s okay to ask questions more than once- in fact, it’s brave to approach a stranger for help at all, even if they’re sitting at a desk marked “information.” even we want to be able to find things ourselves all the time, but opening a dialogue is wonderful and we’re so glad when you do.
  3. you have the right to read whatever it is that you want to read, whether for school, personal enjoyment, enrichment, book clubs you didn’t mean to join, or mere curiosity. you don’t ever have to be embarrassed to ask for something you think we might deem “unacceptable,” and if any library employee makes you feel that way, they don’t belong there.
  4. when you compliment us on our service, or our collection, or our programs, or that comfy chair in the corner, it makes our hearts swell as big as a gutenberg bible.

in other words, thank you to those who visit the library, and all other library professionals who aim to make it a welcoming place. you make what we do meaningful, and we care more than you know.

Yes, yes, yes!  I’ve worked in a school library since 2006 and have observed how rules emphasize the negative and squash curiosity and engagement.  Students generally know what’s expected of them, so I post two rules, which are working great:

  • Ask Questions
  • Be Kind

I may add “Clean up after yourself” as a gentle reminder, though…  =)

9 months ago- 151